Posts Tagged ‘change’

The Never Ending Battle With MS, My Weight and My Laziness

Written by on June 24th, 2014 – 3 Comments

I bIMG_0051ought a new shirt earlier this month. It says “I’m not lazy – I’m physically conservative.” I tend to be on the lazier side – y’know little things like not wanting to get out of bed to answer a phone, stretching as far off my couch to reach my computer without actually getting up, frequently choosing the escalator over stairs.

But I’ve always been active – when I was younger I was in swimming lessons, and my mom would try to get me involved in basketball and soccer (that didn’t stick.) For 8 years I was enrolled in Karate, and that gave me a chance to exercise and get off my couch. I loved it, and even though it’s taken a back seat to my academics and volunteer work, I 100% intend on returning to it.

And my mom always made sure I was a healthy eater – lots of fresh fruit and veggies, homecooked meals as often as possible, limits on the amount of cookies and pop I could have.

But despite that, I’ve never been the healthiest person. I probably like McDonald’s a little too much, and may have some self control issues when a pizza or chocolate is placed in front of me.

However that all changed when I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. I realized that I needed to become more aware of my body, my health and really take control of it. This realization was by no means an instant one. I was diagnosed in July 2012, but it wasn’t until May 2013 that I realized how important it was.

Living on campus, and not having my mom looking over my shoulder led to me not being physically active… at all, and making poor choices about my diet. This led to me getting completely out of shape, and gaining a lot of weight.

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Student Leadership and Multiple Sclerosis

Written by on November 12th, 2013 – 4 Comments

A big part of who I am is the fact that I am a university student. Especially since I live on residence, work three different positions on campus and I’m a full-time student, my university career is my entire life. I even want to work in higher education when I’m older.

However, at the beginning of my journey of living with MS, I didn’t know if that was in the cards for me. I knew I had to avoid stress, but I live off being busy. I call myself a professional busy bee. So how was I supposed to avoid stress, while maintaining the lifestyle I loved and thrived off of?

My philosophy on student leadership needed to be change. Now it is one that has been touted by many: You’re a person first, a student second, and a leader after. I can only be a student leader, and involved in so many things if I’m a student, and I’m putting my academics first. So that needs to be the focus after I’m making sure to take care of myself.

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4 Things I Wish I Knew When I Was First Diagnosed

Written by on August 6th, 2013 – 3 Comments

As I have said before, I was diagnosed just last year, on July 7 2012. Having just passed my one-year anniversary, I’ve been doing a lot of reflections on the past year, my journey as someone who lives with MS, and how I’ve dealt with the first year. There are some things that I definitely wish I had known right off the bat last year, and here’s some them!

1.    Patience is a virtue!

As many people that have MS will know, and for those of you recently diagnosed will learn, there’s a lot of waiting that happens. I waited two months before my first doctor’s appointment after getting diagnosed, and at times that was very frustrating. Knowing that I was living with this, but not knowing anything about from a medical professional was also kind of scary. (Shout out to the MS Society’s website for giving info and putting my nerves at ease!). Besides that, waiting for appointments, medical exams like MRIs or CAT scans, for treatment my patience has been tested. You learn how to wait out those moments, and your patience grows, which is a good thing.

2.    There are really bad moments.

It can kind of really suck sometimes living with MS. Case in point, this past winter break. I had my worst relapse to date: constant nausea, constant vertigo, and loss of movement in my hand and legs, constant tiredness. I spent the vast majority of my winter break on my couch at home, doing absolutely nothing, because I couldn’t (except for venturing to the hospital 5 days in a row for a dose of steroids, even on Christmas.) For somebody who thrives on the energy of others, gets bored of non-activity quickly and is extremely extroverted, this really sucked. I didn’t know how bad my relapses could get so I was so unprepared for it. However, it passed, and I haven’t had a relapse since!

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Start of Something New

Written by on June 11th, 2013 – 8 Comments

Hi there! My name is Juan, and this is my first post, so I should probably introduce myself. I’m very excited to be part of this initiative as it has served as great aid and help to me since I’ve been diagnosed. You see, I was diagnosed with MS in July 2012, so it hasn’t even been a year since I’ve known that I’m living with MS. The time that I’ve seen my neurologist, shorter, and the amount of time that I have been going through treatment for it, even shorter. I’m relatively new to this community, and so, as part of the Internet Generation, I was instantly drawn to the blogosphere that revolves around MS. The someoneonelikeme.ca (et commemoi.ca) has served to bring comfort and put my mind at ease knowing that I wasn’t the only young person with MS.

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So the journey begins… my relationship with Multiple Sclerosis

Written by on March 5th, 2013 – 10 Comments

I always knew that one day I would take care of my parents.  I knew I was part of the ‘sandwich generation’ > folks who would, at some point, take care of both their own children and their parents at the same time.  My mom turned 50 last week… I thought ‘one day’ was 10-15 years away.

The stroke that wasn’t a stroke (not even a TIA) followed by partial paralysis that lasted months;  the loss of function in her hand that eventually came back, months later.  The July morning 2 years ago when she woke up and couldn’t walk.  Except for a brief respite last summer, she hasn’t walked since.

Finally, what we never hoped for

After years of life-changing symptoms… we finally have a diagnosis:  My mother – my beautiful, young, vibrant mother – has Multiple Sclerosis.  She’s never going to walk again.  She’s never going to chase after butterflies with my girls again.  My two youngest will never remember my mom without a walker or a cane.  My oldest asks why her grandma can’t push her on the swings anymore.

I’m angry.  Angry at the doctors that never put 2 & 2 together.  Angry at the genetic makeup that made her susceptible to develop MS.  Angry that she can’t be there for me the way I need her. (more…)

Cape or Glasses?

Written by on December 1st, 2011 – No Comments

Cape or glasses, decisions decisions!

I am known among my friends for being the quiet, reserved, and responsible one. I am the Clark Kent of the story, not Superman (or woman in my case). It is not usually in my nature to be loud, or attention seeking. I am routine oriented, organized and thrive in structure. MS is anything but these things. It’s like this disease lies in wait for you to make plans then mocks you and forces you to change everything. I swear I am only mildly bitter! I don’t get mad though, I get even; at least my version of even.

When I was first diagnosed with MS I felt like my world was spiralling out of control. I couldn’t control my legs, I had appointments all the time, important decisions I didn’t feel ready to make. At 21 I had a hard time coping. So I thought I would control what I could. I started dying my hair. I naturally have dark blonde hair; this would prove to be a very useful canvas. (more…)